Latest News


The Home Energy Saving (HES) scheme provides grants to homeowners who are interested in improving the energy efficiency of their home in order to reduce energy use and costs as well as greenhouse gas emissions. The scheme is open to all owners of existing houses built before 2006. Sustainable Energy Ireland administers the scheme.

 



Attic & Roof insulation      

 

 

 

 

 

Up to 25% of the heat is lost through an uninsulated roof. Insulating or topping up your underinsulated loft is a cheap, fast and effective way to reduce your heating bills and CO2 emissions.

 

With €250 SEAI grant for a roof insulation you can make a great upgrade to the energy efficiency of your house without a large price tag

 

 

 

 

If you do not have insulation in your roof,up to 25% of your heat could escape, costing you money and contributing to atmospheric pollution and global warming. If you have already insulated your roof, you may want to replace it or add another layer to improve its performance and bring it up to current Building Regulations Standards.

 

Energy loss from a home is inevitable. The forces of equilibrium, the physics of nature, continually strive to balance the heat energy on the inside, with that on the outside. Even in the best built houses, when the heating or cooling system goes OFF, the inside and outside temperatures immediately begin to equalize. Attic insulation helps to make energy loss from a home as slow as possible, to minimize the amount of time the heating or cooling system must be on to keep the temperature within a comfortable range. To help achieve this objective, attic insulation is used to control convection.

 

There are three main types of roof that require insulation. The majority of Irish houses have a pitched roof, which is the easiest type to insulate. Generally it can be insulated in two ways:

 

  • Between (and perhaps also above) joists – insulation at ceiling level “cold roof”
  • Between and/or above rafters – insulation at rafter level “warm roof”

 

 

 

When converting your attic into a room, insulation is placed in between the rafters and joists. The insulation can be semi-rigid insulation boards such as expanded polystyrene board, extruded polystyrene board, glass fibre batts, mineral fibre batts, urethane foam board or phenolic foam boards. If a first layer of insulation is placed between rafters, a second, thin layer applied to the underside of the rafters avoids thermal bridging.

 

 

 

Last type of roof construction is a flat roof. The type of insulation used in flat roofs is dependent on the roof structure. On a concrete slab, with a screed, semi-rigid insulation boards such as expanded polystyrene board, extruded polystyrene board, glass fibre batts, mineral fibre batts, urethane foam board or phenolic foam board are laid under the roof covering. In a timber structure, glass fibre quilt and mineral fibre quilt can be laid between the joists. Insulation can be also increased externally with extruded polystyrene or foamed glass, or internally with an insulated lining board such as mineral fibre or polyurethane foambacked plaster-board.

 


 

                  

 

 

The U - value requirement under the 2002 building regulations on insulation for a pitched roof with insulation at ceiling level is 0.16Watts per m2K. That requires 250 - 300 mm of insulation, if you are using rock wool, glass wool, or mineral wool insulation.